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Downie-Wenjack Legacy Space & Collection: Home

Legacy Spaces

Legacy spaces are safe, welcoming places dedicated to providing education and spreading awareness about Indigenous history and our journey of reconciliation. The Legacy Spaces program is an opportunity for corporations, government, organizations and educational institutions to play an important role in their communities.  The spaces are meant to be safe and welcoming places where conversations about the past, present and future are facilitated and encouraged. They also serve as symbols and reminders for employees, clients, students and guests of the important work each of us needs to do if the promises of this country are to be fulfilled.

Information Source: Downie Wenjack Fund, 2018.

 

 

  

Legacy Space Artwork

This drawing was created by Mi'kmaq artist Alan Syliboy. In his words, "This piece represents Chanie Wenjack making his way back to the creator. He travels through the Milky Way, where he is reunited with his mother once again. His spirit lives on without want or hardship." 

 

                        

"They Found Us," is a drawing created by Whitney Gould of We'koqma'q First Nation, incorporates an eagle, traditionally the one animal that can soar to the spirit world, and an orange sunset to represent the spirits of the 215 children found at a B.C. residential school making their way to the spirit world.

Downie-Wenjack Leagacy Space Cape Breton University

In October of 2018, the Downie-Wenjack Legacy Space opened at Cape Breton University and is located on the first floor of CBU Library. We are honoured to host this space which is dedicated to providing accurate information regarding Indigenous history and our shared journey of reconciliation. The Downie - Wenjack Legacy Space is safe and welcoming where conversations about the past, present and future are facilitated and encouraged. It also serves as a symbol and reminder for employees, clients, students and guests of the important work each of us needs to do if the promises of this country are to be fulfilled. The space is primarily utilized by faculty, staff and students to gain insight and understanding into the history of residential schools. The Legacy Space symbolizes the opening of a door- a doorway onto reconciliation.

 

School of Arts and Social Sciences Librarian

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Martin Chandler
he/him
Contact:
902-563-1996